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Scout Light Parts

Frequently Asked Questions

1. When did they start building Scouts?
2. What is the difference between a Scout 80 and a Scout 800?
3. How can I tell if my International Pickup is a 1/2 ton or a 3/4 ton?
4. What were the most noticeable differences in the different Scout II year models?
5. What years did Scouts have disc brakes?
6. How can I tell what axles my Scout has?
7. What engines were available in the Scouts?
8. When did International offer a diesel-powered Scout?
9. What gear ratios were available in the Scout II's?
10. I was wondering why my 1973 Travelall has torsion bar suspension and my 1975 Pickup has coil springs?
11. Did International ever build a Crew Cab Pickup?
12. Where can I find out all the particulars of my IH vehicle in one place?
13. I have noticed all the different Pickup and travelall model designations but don't know what they mean, can you tell me?
14. I have seen a Scout II with a canvas top and canvas-type doors, like a Jeep, was that available from International?
15. What "special edition" Scouts were produced?

“...the staff were always patient, polite, and courteous whenever I called with a question...” Rob Constantine San Diego, CA

1. When did they start building Scouts?
1961 was the first year that the Scout was available. International had been producing Pickups and Travelalls for quite a few years before, but decided in the late 50's to produce a vehicle to compete with the Jeep. The Scout 80 was the designation for the early model Scouts and they were extremely popular from the beginning.
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2. What is the difference between a "Scout 80" and a "Scout 800"?
A Scout 80 was the model designation for the 1961-mid-1965 Scout. These models were identifiable by sliding windows (1961), a 152 4 cyl. engine, a fold-down windshield, vacuum windshield wipers at the top of the windshield and an IH logo in the center of the grill.

The Scout 800 was introduced late year 1965 and continued until mid-year 1971. These models were manufactured with more creature comforts in mind and were identifiable by a fixed windshield, fancier bucket seats, windshield wipers located at the bottom of the windshield, an optional 196 4-cyl., 232 Inline-6, 266 V-8 or even a 304 V-8 in the 1969 and up models. An International nameplate replaced the IH logo on the grill.

The Scout 800 was dressed up and given an "A" or "B" suffix in 1969-1970 and 1970-1971, denoting the upgrades and special "limited edition" packages that were available on those models. The Scout II debuted in May 1971.
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3. How can I tell if my International Pickup is a 1/2-ton or a 3/4-ton?
Generally, an easy way to tell the difference is by how many lug studs are on each wheel.   5 lug studs is a 1/2-ton and 8 lug studs is a 3/4-ton.
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4. What were the most noticeable differences in the different Scout II year models?
From mid-year 1971 to 1980, Scout II's were manufactured.

From 1976-1980 the Scout II, Terra and Traveler were produced as the down-sized replacements for the IH Pickup and Travelall, which had ceased production in 1975. Terras and Travelers were distinctive by their fiberglass tops, either a half-top for the Terra or a full "hatchback-type" top for the Traveler.

1977-1979, International produced a SS II (Soft Safari) Scout model, which was a soft-top, soft door, open air grille edition that was popular with outdoor enthusiasts! Besides these unmistakable models, Scout II's were mostly identifiable by the front grills.

1971 and 1972 Scout II shared the same grill, it was a simple design of three horizontal bars between the headlights and chrome rings around the headlights.

1973 Scout II's had a totally new look in the grill, which now had 14 vertical bars between the headlights, split in the middle, with seven bars on each side surrounded by 2-chrome trim pieces and an International nameplate, low on the drivers side.

1974 and 1975, Scout II's had the same grill design as the 1973, but a vertical bar trim overlay was a much admired addition. In 1975, the chrome rings around the headlights gave way to a more modern square headlight bezel that gave the scout a totally different look.

1976 had a grill all it's own, much different from anything previous. A grill "insert" of 15 horizontal bars, split into three sections adorned the front end, still between and utilizing the square headlight bezels. This grill was only used this one year and was very striking.

1977-1979 Scout II's had again, an entirely different grill. Between the headlight bezels, the scout sported a grill with two large horizontal bars, interspersed with three vertical "supports" and the International nameplate moved up to the center of the grill, drivers side.

1980, the last year of the Scout, had a very distinctive grill design available in either black or silver, it was a one-piece grill with square headlights. This year model is easiest to identify by the grill.
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5. What years did Scouts have disc brakes?
1974 Scouts and later had disc and power brakes, standard from the factory.
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6. How can I tell what axles my Scout has?
Dana 30 front axles and Dana 44 rear axles were standard on the Scout II's, up until 1974. You could special order a Dana 44 front axle for a Scout II in 1974.

In 1974 and later, the Dana 44, front and rear axles were standard in the Scout II's.

If you are not sure which you have, you can compare axle covers. If they look the same, front to rear, they are probably both Dana 44's. If the front cover is a smaller, rounder cover, it is probably a Dana 30.
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7. What engines were available in the Scouts?
International offered a wide variety of engines that a person could have installed in their Scout.

The early Scouts (1961-1971) had the option of a 152 4-cyl., a 196 4-cyl., a 232 inline 6, a 266 V-8 or a 304 V-8. The 4 cyl. even had the option of a turbocharger after 1964.

The Scout II's (1971-1980) had a choice of a 196 4-cyl., a 232 inline 6, a 258 inline 6, a 304 V-8, a 345 V-8 or a SD-33 Diesel or SD-33T Diesel (Turbocharged) engine. The 392 V-8 engine was never installed in a Scout from the factory.

The 304 V-8 and 345 V-8 engines were probably the most popular, followed closely by the diesel engines.
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8. When did International offer a diesel-powered Scout?
1976 was the first year for a diesel-powered Scout. International used the Nissan SD-33 diesel engine for fuel economy.

Complaints of not enough power prompted International to replace the SD-33 with the SD-33T (Turbocharged) diesel engine in 1980. The diesel-powered Scouts were very popular with their fuel-saving economy of 20 mpg city and 30 mpg highway.
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9. What gear ratios were available in the Scout II's?
There was a broad range of gear ratios that were installed in the Scout II's. They included 2:72, 3:07, 3:31, 3:54, 3:73 and 4:09 ratios. The 3:07, 3:54 and 3:73 seemed to be the most popular, depending on where you lived.

Scout 80 models had 4:27 and 4:88 ratios available and the 4:27 carried over to the Scout 800 models as well.

Gear ratios should match from front to rear. Beware, if they don't! The front or rear differential cover should have a small metal tag under one of the bolts that gives the gear ratio. If the tag has been removed or lost, you can remove the cover and count the teeth on both the ring and pinion and divide the number of ring teeth (higher number) by the number of pinion teeth (lower number) and that will give you the gear ratio.

Example: 47-ring teeth
11-pinion teeth
47 - 11 =4:27 gear ratio

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10. I was wondering why my 1973 Travelall has torsion bar suspension and my 1975 Pickup has coil springs?
A. 1969-1973, 1000 and 1010 Series IH Pickups and Travelall had torsion bar suspension to support the entire length box frame for those models.

In 1974, International did away with the box frame for the light 1/2 ton's and they joined the 1100/1200/1500 Series, which were built on a "C" channel frame with coil spring suspension.
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11. Did International ever build a Crew Cab Pickup?
International introduced a crew cab pickup or "Travelette" in 1957, the first manufacturer to do so! It was a three-door, six passenger "A" series pickup. This truck could be ordered with several different engines, a utility box and either 2WD or 4WD. Both the "A" and "B" series Travelettes were one of the less common models, but in 1961, when the Travelette acquired the fourth door, it became more popular.

The Travelette was produced all through the 60's and up until the demise of the light-duty International Pickup line in 1975.
The Crew Cab Travelettes were available with an assortment of engine, transmission, driveline and interior/accessory options. They were especially popular for camping and pulling trailers.
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12. Where can I find out all the particulars of my IH vehicle in one place?
Every International Harvester vehicle that was built had a "Line-Set Ticket" or build sheet that came with it.

The "Line-Set Ticket" is a listing of how that vehicle was supposed to be built and accompanied the vehicle down the assembly line, to provide the workers with "instructions" on the construction of that unit.

The "Line-Set Ticket" lists such things as the particular engine, transmission, driveline, paint codes, gear ratio, and standard and optional equipment, specific to that vehicle.

A miniature copy of the "Line-Set Ticket" was attached to each vehicle in different places, upon leaving the factory. The1971-1976 Scout II's had their copy attached to the cowl panel, under the hood and the 1977-1980 had their copy on the inside of the glove box door. Unfortunately, many of these copies are no longer legible.

The information contained in the "Line-Set Ticket" is very helpful for ordering parts and working on the vehicle. If you no longer have a readable copy or wish to receive a copy of the "Line-Set Ticket" for your vehicle(s), The Scout Connection can order one for you.
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13. I have noticed all the different Pickup and Travelall model designations, but don't know what they mean, can you tell me?
This is one of the most confusing questions we get, so you might want to print this out, for future reference!

For simplicity, we are only going to cover the "D" series ('69-'75) models from 1/2 ton to 1-1/2 ton. If you are interested in other years or have a specific model not covered by this list, we recommend referring to the "International Trucks"  book by Fred Crismon.

1000 Series - 1969-1970 - Light 1/2 Ton (2WD only)
1010 Series - 1971-1973 - Light 1/2 Ton (2WD only)
1100 Series - 1969-1970 - Heavy 1/2 Ton
1110 Series - 1971-1973 - Heavy 1/2 Ton
100/150 Series - 1974-1975 - All 1/2 Ton (Considered Heavy Duty)
1200 Series - 1969-1970 - 3/4 Ton
1210 Series - 1971-1973 - 3/4 Ton
200 Series - 1974-1975 - 3/4 Ton
1300 Series - 1969-1970 - 1 Ton
1310 Series - 1971-1973 - 1 Ton
200 HD Series - 1974-1975 - 1 Ton
1500 Series - 1969-1970 - 1-1/2 Ton
1510 Series - 1971-1973 - 1-1/2 Ton
500 Series - 1974-1975 - 1-1/2 Ton
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14. I have seen a Scout II with a canvas top and canvas-type doors, like a Jeep, was that available from International?
The Scout II model that you are referring to is an S.S. (Soft Safari) II. It was built by International from 1977-1979 and was a direct competitor for the Jeep. The S.S. II resembled other Scout II's of those years, except for the canvas-type soft-top and doors and the distinctive black "open-bar" grill. The S.S. II was produced as an "off-road" vehicle, with no floor covering, vinyl bucket seats and oversize tires. The S.S. II is a popular Scout for people who enjoy the outdoors and off-roading!
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15. What "special edition" Scouts were produced?
International produced quite a few "special edition" scouts over the years. Many were ones that were sent out to subcontracting companies, who actually did the transformations, especially on the later-model Scouts.

International offered the "Sporttop" edition Scout 800, which had a slanted "sporty" top, along with the "Champagne" and "Red Carpet" editions, which were dressed-up 800 models in those colors.

The Scout 800-A and 800-B boasted even fancier editions with the "Aristocrat", "SR-2", "Comanche", and "Sno-Star". Each of these editions had their own special paint schemes/decals and fancy options to set them apart.

In 1976, for the Bicentennial, International produced the "Spirit" and the "Patriot". The "Spirit" had a blue soft-top and red/blue side decals on a white Scout II. The "Spirit" was ONLY available in a Scout II. The "Patriot" had a white hard top and red/blue side decals and was available in a Scout II, Terra or Traveler.

 The "Suntanner" package was available from Intl. for the Terra. It was a dealer-installed package consisting of a white soft-top and attached soft tonneau bed cover.

Starting in 1977, International contracted with Midas Van Conversion Co., to put out special models, including the "Family Cruiser", the "Street Machine" and the "Off-Road Vehicle". These vehicles had swivel bucket seats, shag carpet interiors, sunroofs and flashy decals and paint designs.

Van America Corporation and CVI (Custom Vehicles Incorporated) also produced special models for International, including the "Midnitestar", the "Terrastar",. the" Travelstar" , the "Shadow", the "Classic", the "GMS", the "Hot Stuff", the "Trailstar", the "Sportstar" and the "Raven". All of these models were dressed up with special exterior decals/trim, center console coolers and some editions had plastic window louvers and a plastic tailgate insert.

CVI also produced the "Selective Edition" for International, available on all the Scout models. This package had a choice of 4 colors, complimented with gold wheels, a gold stripe and a black S.S. II grill.

Probably the two rarest models ever produced for International were the "RS" and the "Shawnee". ONLY produced in 1980 and basically as prototypes, the "RS" was strictly a Tahiatian Red Scout with special effects inside and out, including color-coded wheels, elegant all-cloth interior and many extras!

The "Shawnee", produced by The Hurst Corporation, was strictly a black S.S. II, with special decals, special seats, a black targa-style top and hard tonneau bed cover. There were only three of these ever produced. They are very rare and extremely cool!
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